La Voz de Fenix "Voice of the Phoenix" Concert

Evergreen Presbyterian Church host “La Voz de Fénix” – an evening of songs, visual art, food and fellowship on Tuesday, April 16, 2019.

“La Voz de Fénix” (“The Voice of the Phoenix”) is a musical capstone for Evergreen’s Lenten preaching series on immigration justice and migrant narratives. Jim Cornfoot, music director at Evergreen, has assembled a lineup showcasing local spoken word artists and musicians practiced in the genres of rhythm and blues, soul music and American folk. Audience members may also have an opportunity to raise their voices in collective songs of community and protest.

“In much the same way that Lent begins with an imposition of ashes and ends with the promise of resurrection on Easter morning, the Phoenix has long embodied narratives of resilience, reawakening, and resurrection born from the ashes of adversity and death,” said Cornfoot. “We are proud to host a diverse panel of musicians for ‘La Voz de Fénix’ and highlight voices of women, people of color and LGBTQ community members, all of whom are donating their time and talent in an effort to bring some healing and renewal to our burdened and divided community.”

Performers include: Jeff Trotter, Me & Leah, Misti Rae Holton, Mt. & Valley and Damion Kareem.

Attendees were asked to consider a $10 suggested donation. All proceeds raised from this event benefited MICAH (Memphis Interfaith Coalition for Action and Hope), with an emphasis on MICAH’s pillar social justice issue of immigration and intercultural equity.  Refreshments were available from The Fiesta Wagon food truck; and libations and paletas from La Michoacána.

Concert attendees also had the opportunity to view “Jesus at the Border: Stations of the Cross,” a visual art installation by renowned theological folk artist Mary Button. Button’s “Jesus at the Border,” an exploration of migrant journeys to the U.S./Mexico border, attempts to lift up the human stories of migration as an antidote and counter-narrative to the criminalization of migration. View this exhibit and others at www.marybutton.com